What’s up | Aleksandra Josic & Nemanja

Twenty-five years and my life is still
Trying to get up that great big hill of hope
For a destination
I realized quickly when I knew I should
That the world was made up of this brotherhood of man
For whatever that means

And so I cry sometimes
When I’m lying in bed
Just to get it all out
What’s in my head
And I, I am feeling a little peculiar
And so I wake in the morning
And I step outside
And I take a deep breath and I get real high
And I scream from the top of my lungs
What’s going on?

[2x]
And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?

Ooh, ooh ooh

And I try, oh my god do I try
I try all the time
In this institution
And I pray, oh my god do I pray
I pray every single day
For a revolution

And so I wake in the morning
And I step outside
And I take a deep breath and I get real high
And I scream from the top of my lungs
What’s going on?

[2x]
And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?

Ooh, ooh ooh

Cosmopolitismo das diferenças | André Barata

andre_barata_200Cada vitória da integração e da convivialidade é uma derrota da exclusão e uma derrota do ódio do excluído. Integração e convivialidade sob um pressuposto claro: o do direito igual a ser como se prefere ser conjugado com o reconhecimento da reciprocidade universal a esse direito no espaço comum partilhado. Cosmopolitismo das diferenças — é disto que precisamos para desarmadilhar a tentação da radicalização e deixar a pregar para as paredes os fundamentalistas. Conviver com burkinis livremente vestidos não é uma cedência. É uma vitória contra dois obscurantismos: o dos fundamentalistas e o do laicismo persecutório que, sem ceder a comparações, também se obceca com mulheres e com o que elas vestem.

Retirado do Facebook | Mural de André Barata

Is there life out there? | Arlindo L. Oliveira in “Digital Minds”

As reported in an article in the journal Nature, Proxima Centauri (pictured), the star nearest to our sun, has an Earth sized planet, orbiting the “Goldilocks” zone (not too hot, not too cold).

The recently discovered planet orbits the mother star in 11 days, an orbit much smaller and much closer to its sun than the orbit of the Earth. However, since Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf, it is much cooler than our sun, which makes this orbit to be just the right size. The planet, named Proxima Centauri b, weights between 1.3 and 3 times the Earth, which makes it likely that it may be a rocky planet. The distance to the star makes it possible that it may exhibit liquid water.

life

This combination of factors makes it the planet most likely to help us obtain additional information about the possible existence of life outside of Earth. Earth based instruments, such as the European Southern Observatory, ESO, an array of telescopes in the Atacama desert, in Chile, will be able to obtain additional information.

ESO was involved in the discovery of Proxima Centauri b, and likely to play an important role in the discovery of further information about this planet that, in astronomical terms, lies tantalising close to Earth, at “only” 4.2 light-years. Sending a spacecraft out to that planet may also be a possibility, albeit a very challenging one.

The challenges involved in obtaining further information about this planet are significant, but not unsurmountable, as the Economist reports. In a few years, we may have some better answers to Fermi’s famous question, “Where are they?”, referring to the possibility of extra-terrestrial life.

Arlindo L. Oliveira

https://digitalminds2016.wordpress.com/2016/08/26/is-there-life-out-there/